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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
, but as a non-profit, a charity. in its filing with the irs, alec says its mission is education which means it pays no taxes and its corporate members get a tax write-off. its legislators get a lot too. >> in wisconsin, i can't take anything of value from a lobbyist. i can't take a cup of coffee from a lobbyist. at alec, it's just the opposite. you know, you get there and you're being wined and dined by corporate interests, i can go down there, and be wined and dined for days in order to hear about their special legislation. i mean, the head of shell oil flew in on his private jet to come to this conference. the head of one the largest utility companies in the country was there on a panel. utility company in 13 states and here he is presenting to legislators. i mean, they clearly brought in some of the biggest corporate names in "special interestdom" and had that meeting with legislators because a lot of business transpires at these events. >> the most important business happens in what alec calls "task forces." there are currently eight of them, with a corporate take on every important iss
that for decades used one-room schoolhouses to educate its kids. guglich says those days are long gone. >> within the last ten years, we had to start servicing not only the farming counity but now the oil community. >> reporter: guglich expects his student body to double in size in the coming years as oil workers bring their families to williston and more affordable housing becomes available. today real estate prices here are on par with places like new york city and san francisco. new residents are routinely paying more than $2,000 a month in rent. those prices were a problem for guglich, who needed to increase his staff dramatically this year in a state that ranks next to last in the country in teacher pay. >> we hired 14 new teachers and we were able to find housing for most of them, but we still have five teachers who don't have permanent housing. some are staying on couches, some are staying in homes that are in the process of being sold, so they are sleeping on air mattresses, kind of like squatting. >> reporter: one of those squatting teachers is melanie burroughs, who recently moved to wi
was in education in new york state. they have a pretty good retirement program. which i had, of course. so i had a good retirement, social security, compensation check from the veterans, a small one. so i was pretty well set financially to take care of myself. >> sreenivasan: then the couple suffered a string of devastating medical problems. georgia was the first to have to live full time at the nursing home but she fought it tooth and nail. >> i really had a breakdown when they told me i was staying. my heart was set on getting better. i tried and tried and tried. one day we had a meeting with, you know, everyone that was involved. they convinced me that i was number one it was very hard to take, i would never walk again. i can't even stand up completely. >> sreenivasan: their daughter mary ellen became their primary caregiver. she remembers well the stress she was under when a series of serious medical conditions nearly took her dad down. >> there were countless trips in and out of johns hopkins. while i'm taking care of him i'm also still taking my mom to and from her doctors' appointments. i
about telling stories. here's author and educator lou heckler. >> i now get paid for what i used to get punished for-- telling stories! in my more than 30 years as a professional speaker and educator, i can say without fear that much of what we learn we learn through stories. the best bosses i have worked for, the best bosses i have interviewed over the years all tell stories. balancing hard, cold facts with stories satisfies both sides of our brains. the left side-- our judge and jury and number cruncher. and our right side-- our poet and comedian and artist. a good story does three things: it helps us recall the past, it helps us understand the present, and if it teaches a lesson, as most good stories do, it allows us to have some idea of what the future may hold. even a story you have heard or read before may have a new meaning for you today. it's why we go back to texts, religious and otherwise, that have meaning for us. if you manage others, i hope you use stories to inspire, to set limits, maybe just to put a light touch on things from time to time. we all like stories. i'm lou he
to see improvements in education. policy has been stalled for an extended period and a changing world. and we need to catch up. we have to prepare not just for having next year be good but the next ten years, the next 20 years. >> muhamed el-erian, you spoke about the monies that's sitting on the sidelines and i hear ken rogoff referring to that too. with is it going to take that shake that loose to make business owners feel that it's a good thing to invest. >> it's going to take what ken said and critically, it's about a number of items that have to be addressed simultaneously. you know we like this notion. maybe there's a shortcut, maybe there is a killer app, maybe there is this one thing. well, there isn't. it's taken us years to get in this mess. it's going to take us years to get out. and we only get out through simultaneous progress on a number of areas. so ken spoke to fiscal reform. he spoke to infrastructure. he spoke to education. i would add labor retraining and retooling. and i would also add fixing the credit pipes of this economy. so it's a long list. it requires simult
and the-- see, the president has a number of discreet constituents-- latinos, working women, college-educated women-- to whom he has spoken. the thing. a national debate, you're speaking to everybody at the same time. there's no demographic cliques or subgroups. it's everybody. that's consider i think debates are so important. >> woodruff: we're popping the popcorn. we're on the edge of our seats. we'll see both of you in three hours. we will be back at 9:00 p.m. eastern for special coverage of this debate but our effort effoe ongoing online. we will have a live scream where you can watch the debate and live analysis from our team. we're send our "newshour" hat-cam to a debate watch party here in washington. following the debate, "newshour" political editor christina belland tony will be talking to undecide voters at a google-plus hang out >> ifill: still to come on the "newshour": rough flying for american airlines; the pope's butler on trial in rome; chasing the early voters in iowa; a medical breakthrough for critically ill infants and jim lehrer on past debates. but first, with the other
education piece that will continue to be rolled out. you know, and the fact that poll workers can actually still ask people for i.d.s although they don't have to produce it in order to get a regular ballot. we think at the end of the day that the pennsylvania state constitution really does prevent this kind of law from going forward because as the supreme court said it really wantedded to see, you know, make sure that there's no disenfranchisement. we think that there was 760,000 people that the state estimated were going to be impacted by this law. in fact, they have won because they will have access to the ballot in november. >> suarez: representative metcalfe, when is the next biggie leches in pennsylvania after november 6? and will you have time to answer some of ms. browne dianis' complaints? >> we don't need to answer her complaints. the constitution is very clear. this is the responsibility of the legislature. it stands within our area of responsibility to set this process up for the election and ultimately the way the courts have written these decisions, written these opinions it's
that we haven't adjusted, or we don't create an educational system that really signals to students and provides them incentives and information that this is where the jobs are. >> reporter: but thrillist and zocdoc aren't giving up, doing all they can to attract workers and make them feel at home. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: tomorrow on nbr, we'll continue our job retraining coverage with a look at goodwill industries. it's the nation's largest non- profit dedicated to training workers and finding them jobs. and speaking of jobs, tomorrow, the government's monthly jobs report is out-- what it could mean for investors and the presidential election. >> susie: healthy food may soon be coming to a corner near you. two former mcdonald's executives launched lyfe kitchen last year in palo alto, california. now, they plan to take the restaurant and "it's good for you" menu nationwide. diane eastabrook has more. >> reporter: lyfe kitchen opened in the heart of silicon valley a year ago. lyfe, an acronym for "love your food everyday," serves up burgers, fish tacos, breakfast sandwic
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)